Category Archives: Media Placements

Newark Trust for Education Shares How Students Can Succeed During COVID-Era Learning

Going back to school for the 2020-2021 school year will look very different for students, parents, teachers, and administrators. Education nonprofit Newark Trust for Education Executive Director Ronald Chaluisan participated in ABC New York’s “Back to School Town Hall,” an hour-long show on how to help children succeed in this new learning environment.

One of the central points Chaluisan made is that learning is a social activity and, whether going back to school or learning remotely, we should always be thinking of how to safely increase socialization for students so they can succeed emotionally and academically. He also commented that communication between parents and children is important, and having an open dialogue before going back into the classroom can be helpful. This means asking kids questions along the lines of what excites them about the new school year, their plans, and their concerns. He suggests having parents and children role-play situations, like the child seeing his or her friends at school again.

Another education-related issue Chaluisan brought up is anxiety. We need to acknowledge that the world has changed, and so have children’s relationships. Having activities like a peer-to-peer forum would allow these kids to either rebuild or build up new relationships with others. Parent-to-parent forums to discuss how they feel and what is working for them are also very helpful in easing parents’ anxieties.

He looks at this situation as an opportunity to better our education system and bring about more equity – in instruction, technology, socio-emotional learning, communication, and resources. He believes inequity in schools can turn into a front-burner issue that brings parents’, students’, and teachers’ voices together. Watch the Town Hall segment here: https://abc7ny.com/education/abc7nys-back-to-school-town-hall-your-questions-answered/6386869/.

New Jersey Teen Named Boys & Girls Club Youth of the Year

For more than 15 years, Rosica Communications has provided public relations, marketing, and communications services to Boys & Girls Clubs in New Jersey. Today is International Youth Day, and we’d like to recognize Tatiana Cruz, Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s New Jersey Youth of the Year winner. Cruz was selected for her leadership, service, academic excellence, and dedication. She is incredibly involved in her community and is a dedicated member of Boys & Girls Clubs of Hudson County, where for the past eight years, she has held leadership positions. She’s been a member of Junior ROTC, a volunteer with Jersey City Medical Center, and a Boys & Girls Club workforce development program participant. She has also participated in many Club programs such as Career Launch and Diplomas to Degrees, as well as an array of other activities. Cruz is extremely well-rounded, making her the ideal honoree for the Youth of the Year title.

“It’s amazing to be chosen. I’m essentially a role model for club kids, and non-club kids,” Cruz said. “I am honored to promote an organization that cares so much about social justice issues, plus such issues as college career readiness, especially among minority youth.”

Youth of the Year is a national competition hosted by Boys & Girls Clubs of America for high school students to compete for college scholarships and receive ongoing personal and professional development. Cruz won a $12,500 scholarship from Boys & Girls Clubs in New Jersey and Boys & Girls Clubs of America. Read more about Cruz and her Youth of the Year award here: https://www.tapinto.net/sections/education/articles/jersey-city-s-tatiana-cruz-named-boys-girls-club-of-america-youth-of-the-year

NSHSS Conducts Gen Z Career Interest Survey

A survey recently conducted by The National Society of High School Scholars (NSHSS) reveals workplace benefits Gen Z students care about most and where they’d prefer to work.

Each year, NSHSS distributes a survey asking high school and college students about their future plans and aspirations. This year, 14,000 students completed the survey.

NSHSS President James Lewis said, “This is a group of empowered young adults who intend to shape the problems and opportunities they face, not stand on the sidelines. They told us human rights is a primary concern, followed by healthcare and education. Gen Z will be bringing their social justice agenda to the workplace; they expect future employers to reflect their convictions, including having women and racially diverse individuals in leadership positions.”

Survey results show Gen Z places importance on social justice and ranks health insurance over pay and flexible work schedules. This generation is most interested in medical careers, skills development (rather than simply acquiring knowledge), being able to pay off student loans, and having a feeling of balance and belonging. Top employers Gen Z would like to work for include local and regional hospitals, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Mayo Clinic, Google, and Walt Disney Company.

Read more about this in-depth Gen Z workplace survey here: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/352493

The Salvation Army Provides Youth with a Camp Experience Despite COVID-19

Most camps are closed, but thanks to the Salvation Army of Greater New York, children are now enjoying a camp experience – from their homes. Underserved kids and families are receiving games, activities, arts and crafts supplies, even snacks, sunglasses, and t-shirts, delivered to their residences.

Once a week, “campers” will receive a box with different themed items and activities they would get if they were actually attending camp in person.

Each fun and educational box addresses areas of concern, such as food insecurity, summer learning loss/regression, and anxiety/stress. With a mission to provide services to children in need, every child will also be assigned a virtual camp counselor to interact with, whether over the phone or through video chat.

Nonprofit New York Cares volunteers meet with the Salvation Army of Greater New York staff and volunteers to assemble and deliver more than 1,000 boxes each week providing kids this welcomed reprieve throughout New York’s five boroughs, the Hudson Valley, and Long Island.

CBS New York, Fox 5 New York, and Spectrum 1 News covered the story. You can find CBS New York’s story here and a video from Fox 5’s segment here.

Newark Public Library Names New Director

Recently covered by ROI-NJ and other New Jersey media outlets, Joslyn Bowling Dixon, who has more than 20 years of experience working in large urban public libraries, has been appointed as the Newark Public Library’s new director. Effective August 3, Bowling Dixon will oversee the Library and its community branches. She will also advance the Library’s initiatives by building partnerships with Newark’s cultural and educational communities, supporting fundraising efforts, and more. Ready to move through the challenges between the online and virtual world, she seeks to strengthen the ties the Library has to the community.

Newark Public Library’s President Lauren Wells says, “The board of trustees is excited to welcome Joslyn because we see in her someone who understands the needs of diverse communities, young people, and families. We are certain her leadership will enhance library partnerships, broaden access to funding, and drive breakthrough programming. I believe Joslyn’s experience, spirit of collaboration, and enthusiasm to become a part of our library and city make her the leader we need for these times, and beyond.”

The announcement has received such publicity as ROI-NJ, Spot On New Jersey, and Newark Newsbreak.

Newark Trust for Education Talks School Reopenings

We recently secured coverage on NJ.com for education thought leader Newark Trust for Education. The Trust’s Executive Director Ronald Chaluisan spoke about his thoughts on New Jersey schools reopening this fall after closing in March because of COVID-19.

Reopening schools after students have been learning at home for months comes with complications. Educators and school officials have conflicting thoughts on the state’s new back-to-school guidelines: are they too strict or are they too vague? Different school districts, whether urban or suburban, have different needs. For Newark, Chaluisan’s main concern is about the digital divide students face; many children may not have access to the internet or technology they need to succeed. The city has 55,000 students and one device is typically not enough for an entire household. The state’s guidelines also do not indicate how schools will know if their reopening strategy is effective or not.

In the article, Chaluisan is quoted, “We could talk about reopening, flexibility, local decision-making, but one of those guideposts needs to be — ‘We will be successful if…’ And since the state holds that definition, it’s important they make that explicit.”

You can read the full article here: https://www.nj.com/coronavirus/2020/06/too-many-rules-or-not-enough-nj-plan-to-reopen-schools-has-district-leaders-scrambling.html 

National Society for High School Scholars Makes National News

Rosica Communications helped the National Society of High School Scholars (NSHSS) make national news with an in-depth article in Newsweek. National Society of High School Scholars is a distinguished academic honor society, committed to recognizing and serving high achieving student scholars in more than 26,000 high schools across 170 countries.

The article reported on findings from a new national survey that NSHSS conducted among more than 2,000 high school students. Among other information, the article discusses the implications online only schooling could have on many college campuses next year, with 32% of incoming college freshman saying they would defer admission to next year. NSHSS President James Lewis, talks about his belief that students will continue to attend these institutions despite the online schooling and continue pursuing their college education to earn a degree.

According to the NSHSS survey, over 94% of respondents surveyed are pretty hopeful or very hopeful that they will achieve a college education, which is most important to the students and college administration. Students will to adapt to the new e-learning style even if it is not their preference for learning. However, according to the survey, 53% of students surveyed prefer in-person classes but could deal given the circumstances. This speaks volumes. The students understand that online learning is less than ideal but will adjust and continue to accel in their education.

In the article, Lewis is quoted, “I think that students will adapt, and institutions will get better at delivering the college experience in a virtual way,” Lewis told Newsweek. “Students may complain about the things they are missing, but I am confident that they will make the best of the situation.”

To view the entire story click here https://www.newsweek.com/32-percent-students-say-they-wont-go-college-next-year-if-classes-are-online-only-1503248

Washington Examiner Shares Chris Rosica’s View on Storytelling in Times of Crisis

In yesterday’s Washington Examiner, COVID-19 crisis communications expert Chris Rosica was asked to comment on Dr. Deborah Birx’s story delivered at the White House’s daily coronavirus briefing. Dr. Birx shared her grandmother’s heart-wrenching story and a plea not to be the person who introduces the virus to a vulnerable person. According to Washington Examiner reporter Rob Crilly, Dr. Birx said, in reference to the Spanish flu epidemic, that her “grandmother Leah lived with a lifetime of guilt after bringing flu home from school, she said.”  

In the article, Crilly states: “Chris Rosica, a crisis communications expert, said storytelling made people tune in, remember the message, and, most importantly, share it. Birx, he said, had a powerful ability to connect with her audience.” Rosica added, “When it comes to storytelling, personal stories are often the most effective ways to communicateThey not only suck people in, but there’s also an emotional element beyond the facts and the science.” 

 

To view the entire story click here https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/immunologist-mother-granddaughter-how-dr-deborah-birx-is-humanizing-the-coronavirus-pandemic. 

James Lewis of the National Society of High School Scholars featured on CNBC.com

James Lewis, president of the National Society of High School Scholars (NSHSS), was recently featured on CNBC.com on smart ways families can obtain scholarships.

He commented on the various types of scholarship opportunities that exist for athletes, minorities, and students in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM).

For the complete article, click here.

Employers Turning to Pharmacy Benefit Managers to Fight Employees’ Prescription Drug Abuse

BeneCard PBF President Michael Perry shares how pharmacy benefit managers can be a key ally to reduce wasteful and inappropriate prescription utilization.

More than 10 million people in the United States misused a prescription opioid in 2018, and the opioid epidemic cost the country $179 billion including mortality, health care expenses, lost productivity, criminal justice expenses and assistance. The National Safety Council notes that the annual direct health care costs of individuals who misuse opioids are 8.7 times higher than those who do not.

The opioid epidemic offers an example of a preventable, complex public health and safety issue that has arisen due to a perfect storm of causative factors. Consequently, it requires multiple stakeholders to develop and deliver an effective solution to help lower costs and improve patient health outcomes. These stakeholders include health care providers, pharmacies, drug manufacturers and even employers.

However, the pharmacy benefit manager is one player in the opioid crisis that fills a critical role by employing clinical programs to ensure safe and appropriate utilization of medications. The PBM is a third-party administrator of prescription drug programs and primarily responsible for contracting with pharmacies for network services, negotiating discounts and rebates with drug manufacturers, developing and maintaining the plan’s list of covered drugs (a formulary), and processing and paying prescription drug claims.

PBMs have become an increasingly important part of health benefits since they first entered the market in the 1970s. Today, three pharmacy benefit managers control more than 80 percent of the American market. All are part of massive health care conglomerates that have interests in other aspects of the benefits food chain — from retail pharmacies to medical insurance.

This can create conflicts of interest, as these mega-corporations stand to profit from every stop on a patient’s journey. These conflicts of interest can in turn leave employers and patients vulnerable to increasing health care costs and crises such as the opioid epidemic.

The American public, from the employee to the executive suite and human resources professionals, as well as those who make decisions about employee-sponsored health care, seeks change in today’s profit-driven benefits industry. Here are just a few of the reasons why:

 

Read the rest of the article here.

Expert Crisis Communications Council

Rosica specializes in health-related strategic internal and external corporate communications and media relations. We are helping corporations, public and private schools, universities, and nonprofits with COVID-19 communications preparedness and management.